Australia ranks 19th on list of top countries where people want to work

TWO countries known for crappy weather — Ireland and Iceland — have been proclaimed as being better than Australia and its sunshine when it comes to being good places to work.

The World Talent Ranking 2017 report, compiled by the IMD World Competitiveness Centre, finds Australia is not as alluring as it used to be for jobseekers when it comes to attracting, retaining and developing staff.

Australia came in 19th on the World Talent Ranking list. Picture: Getty Images
Camera IconAustralia came in 19th on the World Talent Ranking list. Picture: Getty ImagesPicture: Getty Images

Switzerland, Denmark and Belgium were rated the top three countries, while 11 of the top 15 were located in Europe.

Australia dropped three spots compared to last year’s report, coming in at 19th, falling below Cyprus and Iceland, which retained their 17th and 18th positions respectively. Ireland climbed up three spots to take 14th position.

Not bad weather in Ireland, if you’re chained to your desk. Picture: Supplied
Camera IconNot bad weather in Ireland, if you’re chained to your desk. Picture: SuppliedPicture: Supplied

However, Australia still ranked better than the UK (21st).

The World Talent Ranking is based on a country’s performance in three main categories — investment and development, appeal and readiness — from a survey of more than 6000 business executives in 63 countries.

The categories assess how countries perform when it comes to education, apprenticeships, workplace training, language skills, cost of living, remuneration, tax rates — and quality of life.

The report found Australia fared best in the world when it comes to the number of international students per capita.

Salaries for those in service professions and quality of life also were appealing attributes.

But the low use of apprenticeships, high cost of living, and low government spending on education were cited as turn-offs.

Just another commute on a beautiful summer day in Iceland. Picture: Istock
Camera IconJust another commute on a beautiful summer day in Iceland. Picture: IstockPicture: istock

The centre’s senior economist Dr Jose Caballero says Australia did rank high in quality of life (11th) but was low in investment and development (36th).

“The country’s performance in the expenditure on education per pupil (44th), the implementation of apprenticeships schemes (51st) and the prioritisation of employee training (43rd) may be of concern for the sustainability of its talent flow,” he says.

“For example, the low performance in expenditure on education may help explain the decline in the capacity of the educational system to meet the demand for talent, and also be related to the decline in the emphasis given to teaching science in schools.

“Similarly, the worsening of the country’s performance in the apprenticeships and employee training indicators may have led to the drop in the availability of skilled labour.

“Apprenticeships and training, in addition to the prioritisation that companies assign to attracting and retaining talent (28th), can also help to explain the lower levels of worker motivation (35th).”

People want to live in Australia, they just don’t want to work here. Picture: iStock
Camera IconPeople want to live in Australia, they just don’t want to work here. Picture: iStockPicture: Supplied

Iceland ranked 11th for investment and development, because of its high public expenditure in education.

Student-to-teacher ratios were among the top five in the world, while quality of life also was rated as high.

Ireland ranked 5th for appeal, largely because employers made attracting and retaining workers a priority.

While its public expenditure in education ranked poorly, it made up for it by having competent senior managers and motivated workers.

Lithuania was rated the best country for women in work, with a 50/50 gender split.

Norway had the best quality of life.



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